How to Prevent Pet Poisoning

sick puppy - french bulldog with hot water bottle on head isolated on white background

by Nancy Hassel, ThisFurryLife.com

March is Poison Prevention Awareness Month, and of course that awareness very much includes our pets.  Many household items we use daily can be toxic and even deadly to our pets, and being aware of this can save your pet from danger.

There are also and human foods that can be unsafe for your pet to ingest that you may not realize.  Be aware of what to avoid giving your pet and what your pets could get into.   Just like you would with your human kids, you need to pet proof your house so you adorable new puppy or newly adopted shelter pet cannot get into these items.  You’ll be amazed how high a dog or cat can jump up onto things or dogs that like to counter surf.  Get your kids involved to so they know what NOT to give your pets.

For Dogs:

Chocolate
Xylitol – Sweetener often found in gum
Grapes and Raisins
Antidepresent Medication
Caffenine
Alcohol
Avocado
Macadamia Nuts
Onions, Chives, Garlic – can cause gastrointestinal problems and possibly red-cell damage.
Tylenol, Ibuprofen, NASIDS – goes without saying never give your pet ANY drugs without consulting with your veterinarian FIRST!
Mouse and Rat Poison
Cleaning Products
Antifreeze for your car
Yeast Dough
There are many additional items that can be poisonous to your dog, you can click here to see a comprehensive list.

For Cats:

Dog Flea & Tick Medication – if your dog is given a topical treatment, make sure your cat is not then grooming your dog!

The list above also applies to cats, but cats who also like to chew on and eat houseplants click here for a great comprehensive list from WebMD.

There are excellent resources to call if you need to speak with someone about whether you think your pet may have ingested something that could be poisonous or not.  The Pet Poison Helpline is one, and the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center – be aware that there is a cost for both services, the Pet Poison Helpline is a $49 per icident fee and the ASPCA there is a $65 consultation fee that may be applied to your credit card, according to their website.  It is a very small price to pay to help save your pets life.

You can download and print these and hang them on your refrigerator, near your phone and also program the numbers in your cell phone in case you are not home for quick access in case of an emergency

And also, put your local 24 ER veterinary hospital in your cell phone (and the same when you are traveling with your pets.)

PetPoison ASPCA Poison Hotline

%d bloggers like this: